Weeding Your Garden - Gina Waterfield
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Weeding Your Garden

Weeding Your Garden

Self sabotage is like a weed – a wild unsavory seed. Once it gets placed into our psyche, early in life, it can grow faster than the healthy growth all around it. There can be a subliminal and pervasive shame or guilt that keeps us from success. These weeds can block the sunlight from our healthy nature – our true spiritual self.

We need to root out these weeds. To fully develop our success in life, in love, and in our profession, we need to closely examine the early childhood messages we were exposed to. Looking at our familial history can help us expose the roots of our limiting beliefs.

The objective is to learn where our fear of surpassing family archetypes was created. Those early messages were implanted in our young, impressionable mind. This is the truth of early auto-programming that has been revealed by neuroscience breakthroughs and epigenetic studies.

I see examples of this in my professional practice with clients. Under hypnosis they remember those early experiences like “don’t get too big for your britches” or “who do you think you are” or “we don’t act like that.” They remember a host of other well intentioned but negative comments that were repeated time and again.

Remembering those messages and family attitudes helps to remove their power. Once you acknowledge where those mental/emotional weeds were planted, you can begin to uproot them and replace them with healthy thoughts and aspirations. The real, one and only empowered you!

Then we can begin to make good things happen. We can manifest a better life. But, manifesting can only work when we discover, understand and remove the mental and emotional blocks – the weeds.

I have learned in my work that this discovery and removal of these weeds is best done with a healthy dose of compassion and empathy.

“I must always be a gentle gardener, if I am to help the blossoming of new life.”

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